Irish Proverb 25 - Seanfhocail Ghaeilge 25

Is é seo Seanfhocal an Lae:

Today's Proverb is:

Beidh lá eile ag an bPaorach.

Seo ciall an tseanfhocail:

The translation or meaning is:

There'll be another day.

An bhfuil a mhalairt de thuairim agat maidir le ciall an tseanfhocail seo, nó ar mhaith leat an t-aistriúchán s’agatsa a roinnt linn? Déan caint ar seo thíos.

Got a different idea on what this proverb means or want to share your own translation? Comment below. 

 


Posted Mar 25 2017

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Stefan Gillies wrote re: Irish Proverb 25 - Seanfhocail Ghaeilge 25
on Wed, Mar 30 2011 4:22

A little research for the literal translation came up with "there'll be another day at the Paor" ( last words from the gallows of Edmund Power of Dungarvan, executed for his part in the Wexford Rebellion of 1798)

Dale D wrote re: Irish Proverb 25 - Seanfhocail Ghaeilge 25
on Mon, Mar 26 2012 19:23

Sounds like something more akin to "You'll get yours some day!" spoken in the vein of a threat of repraisal or vengance, as opposed to Scarlet O'Hara's "Tomorrow is another day."  The translation implies that the origin of the statement was hidden, or at least kept oblique, so that it could be spoken and understood by those familiar with its origin but passed off as something akin to Scarlet O'Hara's meaning to those who didn't.

Dale D

seano wrote re: Irish Proverb 25 - Seanfhocail Ghaeilge 25
on Mon, Mar 26 2012 20:50

You may be right, Dale. It is certainly saying that his spirit will live on and that the fight isn't over. Stefan, you're right about this but it isn't "the Paor" it's "de Paor", which is the Irish version of the surname Power. Many Irish surnames of French or English origin have a "de" in front of them - de Buitléir, de Búrca, de Grás.

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