How to say a few things ...

Latest post 04-30-2011 2:15 by jen25. 27 replies.
  • 12-15-2008 0:37

    • Frankie
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    How to say a few things ...

    Hello, I was wanting to know how to say a few things so I can speak and teach my kids.

    But it's mainly things I would say to them, think it's good for them to start to learn languages too.

    I see Michelle helps alot of us on here, so Michelle, you might be able to also help me Hmm Or anyone who would know.

    But here I go, things I like to know how to say in Irish for the time being.

    "Come here"

    "Don't run"

    "Walk" & "Stop"

    "Stay with me"

    "Don't do that"

    Thanks for any help anyone can give.

    Cheers, Frank.

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  • 12-15-2008 3:39 In reply to

    • michelle
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Oh that's a great idea Smile

    Right, I'm on the case (I'm just a learner too, so I can't answer you straight away).

    If anyone else has any phrases or ideas of what's useful for learning with kids, post them here.

    Slán anois, Michelle

    Is fearr dhá theanga ná ceann amháin…

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  • 12-15-2008 9:29 In reply to

    • tora
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Dia duit a Frank!

    We're doing imperative in class so I'll have a go...there's one form for 2nd person singular and one for 2nd person plural so I've listed both. Apologies in advance for any mistakes...

    Come here - téigh anseo!/téigí anseo!

    Don't run - ná rith!/ná rithigí!

    Walk - siúl/siúligí

    Stop - stop/stopaigí or stad/stadaigí

    Stay with me - stay is fan/fanaigí and I think it goes with "lo" so it would be "fan liom/fanaigí liom" but don't quote me on this one

    Don't do that - ná déan sin/ná déanaigí sin

    And here's another one we did in class:

    Don't jump on the bed - ná léim ar an leaba/ná léimigí ar an leaba

     

    Slán go fóill, Tora

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  • 12-15-2008 20:59 In reply to

    • Frankie
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Mora dhuit Tora!

    Go raibh maith agat for the phrases in Irish Tora.

    I'm going to give them ago. "Don't jump on the bed", is a good one Wink

    I say things to them like "Maith go leor" - "Maith thu" and other stuff like that.

    Now I can give them some instructions, that they can try to comprehend. And obviously we can have fun with Irish and enjoy the language together.
    I'll continue to find out more, but atleast I have a lead on things, and things to practice.

    Go raibh maith agat Tora for your response!

    Slán agus bíodh lá maith agat! Frank

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  • 12-15-2008 21:37 In reply to

    • Frankie
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Dia dhuit Michelle!

    Rinne mé dearmad go raibh maith agat (ná duit?)

    I was trying to say I forgot to thank you too Michelle for your response aswell.
    I'm looking forward to joining an Irish club where I can try out my Irish. And hopefully there are people that can speak gaeilge so I can learn more.

    But its good for the kids to get involved too, like we count, and do the small talk of how they are feeling and that. Something about learning Irish is very uplifting, because I think its for the things the Irish have gone through in there long history, and yet the language has survived. I just think about being Samoan, and its always a nice sense to know you belong, and the strong culture there is with language and independce as a country. So the same should be and most definitely be felt when you learn any language. I could be rambling, but it does something good for your soul to learn a language Smile

    Any idea while your on the case how to say rugby? And if there is a word for Samoa?

    Go raibh maith agat agus slán, Frank.

     

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  • 12-17-2008 3:11 In reply to

    • michelle
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    RUGBY - RUGBAÍ

    rugby is rugbaí - it's not a word native to Irish.

    You can say Is maith liom rugbaí for I like rugby

    Beidh mé ag imirt rugbaí for I will be playing rugby.

    Bhí mé ag imirt rugbaí for I was playing rugby.

    SAMOA - SAMÓ
    Samoa is Samó.

    Samoan the nationality is Samóch.

    Samoan the language is Samóis.

    Western Samoa is Samó Thiar.

    So I think you can say 'Tá Samóch [Samóis] agam' for I speak (lit have) Samoan - I'm going on the basis you can say "Tá Gaeilge agam' for I speak (lit have) Irish.

    I think you can say 'Is as Samó mé' for I'm from Samoa! I know you can say 'Is as Éirinn mé' - I'm from Ireland but it's 'Is as an Fhrainc mé' in Ulster dialect for I'm from France. Apparently the reason is that most of the traditional country names have the article, except Ireland, Scotland and England. Many of the newer countries like Samó also lack the article.

    I think of words like rugbaí and Samó as gift words - they're easy for you to add to your Irish vocab, but also help you with Irish pronunciation!

    I think learning any language is fantastic for your brain. And there's something special about learning an endangered language. Every word you put in your head can help the language's future :)

    I'll try and get some recordings of phrases useful for páistí early in an Blian Nua.
    Go raibh maith agat,
    Michelle

    Is fearr dhá theanga ná ceann amháin…

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  • 12-18-2008 0:19 In reply to

    • Frankie
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Fa'afetai lava Michelle! (Just saying thank you very much in Samoan)

    Is maith sin Michelle! Ar fheabhas! Just stacking up the Irish vocab so i'll be able to reply with what I'm collecting.
    I've had a few conversation's in Irish (too far and few between) and they have all gone the same way, fun, but boy do I need a night class. But there are none from where I am in Wellington. I know they have one in Auckland, but that's miles and miles away.
    But the general conversation is like "hi, how are you?" -  "I'm good, and you?" - "Where, your from?" - (Now I can say that I'm also Samó fosta Kiwi) but yeah, then I end up saying I only speak a little Irish, but learning. Always a bit of laughter from the other side. I think I'm going to be one of those that will have to mix the Irish with the English for quite sometime, just as the way I'm typing.

    But it's cool that there is borrowed words, they can be fun and funny to find them out, just like in the Samoan language. The word for Ireland in Samoa is "Irelani" = phonetically; eye'ah - lah'nee. There is a tricky tounge thing you have to do with Samoan's "n's" and "g's" ... Boy, back to the Irish!

    This year, I'm going to make a real effort, I've been looking at Irish for about 7-8 years (seems like a long time), just fascinated by it, but never doing anything about it. 
    This year is the first real attempt. Good that there is a website like this, very encouraging, I do get thrown by all the dialects and the way that the order of things get mentioned in a sentence. But that's the beauty of languages such as Irish. So just want to say I agree with your thoughts Michelle, and I'd be very proud to help the Irish language by learning it! 

    I do have to say, not meaning to ruffle any feathers, but I do like how the Ulster dialect sounds and can see how the Scots could almost understand them. But I've been tryinig to learn the Connacht way of speaking, my question for anyone is that on the Irish I have been learning off a computer software, there is "Yes" and "No" on there. Except I haven't heard anyone say it or seen anyone write it ... "Is ea = Yes" agus "Ni hea = No". Any idea's anyone why it's not mentioned often, I think I hear "Nil" for "no" more then anything I believe.

    Go raibh maith agat Michelle agus trying to help with my Gaeilge.
    Frank.

    PS: Oh yeah, that would be very cool if you got something's you can say to kids in the new year. Also feels like a good place for learner's like me to start too Smile

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  • 12-18-2008 4:32 In reply to

    • tora
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Hello,

    I've learned that to say where you're from, you use "do" - as in "Is as Éirinn dom" for I'm from Ireland. Could be different ways of saying it in different dialects of course!

    And they say that there isn't really a "YES" and "NO" as we're used to it. It's a bit complicated, let's see if I can explain:

    There are two werbs for "to be" - "is" which describes qualities etc, and "bí" that describes where something is, or how you are temporarily (VERY simplified)

    So "I'm Irish" uses IS, as it is a quality that isn't easily changed, while "I'm well" uses "bí" to say "Táim go maith"

    If you ask a question where you use a form of IS, you can answer "Is ea" and "Ni hea"

    If you use any other verb, you need to use the affirmitve of that particular verb. So, if I ask if you're well, An bhfuil tú go maith? you'll answer "Táim/Tá mé" or "Níl" (which is the negative of bí).

    "Do you play rugby?" would be "An imríonn tú rugbaí?" and you'd answer it "Imrím" or "Ní h-imrím" (not sure about the "h", but I think it has to be there...)

    Hope this makes sense and that I haven't left too many errors in there...beginner myself as you know.

    Slán go fóill, Tora

     

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  • 12-18-2008 18:57 In reply to

    • Frankie
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Hi Tora, thanks for your input. It is insightful.

    Tá sé tábhachtah ... Boy I try to say things in Irish, ach then there are words nil a fhios agam what to say next, ach just know how important it is for me to get my head around, forming question's and knowing what is the correct way for me to reply. That haon thing I'm going to concentrate on.

    But thanks again for your help Tora, I'm so looking forward to the new year, where I can put more effort into it! But what I'm doing at the moment is a bonus, so happy I have this website to get help!

    Bíodh lá maith agat, slan.
    Frank.

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  • 12-19-2008 10:11 In reply to

    • debra
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Dia duit, a Frankie,  Here's a VERY IMPORTANT phrase that you forgot to add to your list of things to say to your children..Ná habair sin!  Don't say that!!  lol...remember, kids say the wildest things.   Slán, Deb

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  • 12-21-2008 17:29 In reply to

    • Frankie
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Dia is Muire duit a Deb.

    Yeah that is a good instruction for kids, "Don't say that". But what I would also like to say is "Don't do that". For me being a newbie to this language, talking to kids, and having them learn phrases to say back is an excellent building block Geeked

    "Sin" would that mean "That"? Cause I was thinking, "Sin é" would mean "that's it" (is that correct?)
    So "Ná" would mean "Not or No or don't" I'm guessing. So I would just need to know, what is the Irish word for "Do".

    I'm kinda thinking out loud in my typing, and I'm being a bit lazy, I'm sure I'd find it if I worked harder, time for me to get a good Irish dictionary!

    Keep up the good work Deb, love all that Southern stuff too! Hehe, Slán.

    PS: I found out a way you could say "Don't do that" ... It's "Ná déan sin". And the another one is, "Come here", it's "Tar anseo". That was what I found out thanks to "Smofathaigh". Go raibh maith agat Seán!

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  • 01-25-2009 7:57 In reply to

    • Gearoid
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Thought I'd give you a bit of help here on saying 'do' and 'don't'...

     

    The verb to ‘break’ is ‘Bris’ so:

    Break the window = Bris an fhuinneog (Literally ‘Do break the window.’)

    – means don’t - You simply place ‘Ná’ in front of the verb to give a negative order so:

    Ná bris an fhuinneog = don't break the window.

     

    Therefore ‘Do’ in Irish is just a matter of deciding the action you want the person to do and using the verb for the action.

    For example:

    Cuir = Put                                Cuir ort do chóta                      Ná Cuir ort do chóta

                                                    (DO) Put on your coat              Don’t put on your coat


    Ceannaigh = Buy                      Ceannaigh arán                         Ná ceannaigh arán

                                                    (DO) Buy bread                       Don’t buy bread


    Tóg = Lift/Build                        Tóg na bréagáin                        Ná tóg na bréagáin

                                                    (DO) Lift the toys                     Don’t lift the toys


    Éist = listen                               Éist Liom                                  Ná héist liom   

                                                    (DO) Listen to me                    Don’t listen to me

    Le meas,

    Gearóid

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  • 01-30-2009 21:39 In reply to

    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Hmmm...I think it is "Is as Éire mé," as response to Cá as tú (or thú).

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  • 02-15-2010 22:44 In reply to

    Re: How to say a few things ...

    How do you say I don't need your critisicm, I tried you sing a translator but it was horribly wrong and it change the original sentence...

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  • 02-18-2010 11:44 In reply to

    • lanstad
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    Re: How to say a few things ...

    Dia Duit Frank,

    Great to see someone hailing from the same neck of the woods like me.It's awesome that you are learning Irish and teaching your kids Irish too.

    I wish everyone here in Ireland was like you,Irish would be the first language of Ireland again overnight.

    It's even more fantastic that a Samoan take pride in the Irish language and culture!.

    Have you been to Ireland yet?.There are lots of Irish in Wellington and I think there is an Irish Club there too,that would be the best place to seek out someone who could help you with the pronunciation.There are alot of native speakers outside of Ireland due to the huge emigration that has drained the country of its best and dearest.The likely hood is that you will find a good number of them in the Irish club.

    I came here to Ireland years ago to learn Irish,but was very disappointed at the lack of enthusiasm and sometimes downright aggression towards the native language of Ireland.Only a handful of faithful here (and alot of them are foreigners)in Ireland continue to keep the language alive.

    The Government here is next to useless when it comes to reviving the Irish language here in Ireland.Their policies and attitude is crippling.

    Recently I walked into the main post office on OConnel st,Dublins Capital street. (this is an iconic building in Irish history) and had the security on my back for speaking Irish there.Even though there are signs everywhere in Irish inside the building,God help you if you have the audicity to actually speak it there!.

    so this is the actuall reality that I have experienced on a daily basis whilst I have lived in Ireland and sometimes I feel like giving up until I meet people like you who remind me and revive  in me the same enthusiasm that I  had when I first came to Ireland many moons ago,and mostly it was non Irish enthusiasts like you who have kept my ambition alive.

    Irish children here can spend their 10 years of Irish schooling here and walk away without a word of Irish.Thats how bad things are here.

    So here's to you Frank .Go méadaí Dia thú do stór!.(May God grant you your treasure!.)

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