Vocabulary list

Latest post Fri, Jan 18 2013 15:43 by celticlord88. 6 replies.
  • Tue, Jan 15 2013 23:50

    • celticlord88
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    Vocabulary list

    Is there any way for users to download the vocabulary lists to their computer? The lessons are great. If not, I can just type out the words manually. Thanks!

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  • Wed, Jan 16 2013 0:59 In reply to

    • Princess L
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    Right click on their link, then click on "Save as..." or "Download as..." ;)

     

    Edited: Haha, whoops -- Unless you mean the free Buntus Cainte lesson (since this is the Buntús Cainte section). I don't think you can download the vocabulary from that lesson (from what I remember), but you can always take notes of them like you said. Otherwise, I believe you have to purchase the full course(s) to get them on your device. >.< If you do mean the Focal an Lae, then it really is just right clicking and saving the sound files. I used to save everything like that and then synced the files to my iPod. 

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  • Wed, Jan 16 2013 8:57 In reply to

    • hallion
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    Sadly, we don't have a license to provide downloadable vocabulary lists for the Buntús Cainte interactive course.

    You can buy the MP3 course for iPhone and iPod, which has the lyrics embedded into the audio, so you can listen to the course and read the Irish and English at the same time.

    But all our Focal an Lae and SeanFhocal an Lae audio, flashcards and text are free to download and share.

    Not sure how other people learn, but even though I have lists and lists of Irish (and French) on my computer, I tend to both write lists longhand with pen and paper, and to type them in myself. Somehow this seems to help me remember things. I guess it goes right back to when I was a child and I remember being able to read words, but when I could write them, I felt I'd 'conquered' them Smile

    Anyone else got strategies not just for collecting Irish on their device, but for making it stick in their head?

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  • Wed, Jan 16 2013 9:00 In reply to

    • hallion
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    I used to use the flashcard slideshow as a lazy way to revise the Focal an Lae vocabulary - you tried it?

    http://talkirish.com/media/g/flashcards/slideshow.aspx

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  • Wed, Jan 16 2013 12:40 In reply to

    • celticlord88
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    I've started to writing them down on paper. It helps me to learn and practice pronounciation. That's why spelling tests helped so much in elementary. I also use Anki which is great for drilling.

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  • Fri, Jan 18 2013 10:01 In reply to

    • Princess L
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    I know what you mean about "conquering"! But after a while, by writing or typing lists of vocabularly, my brain sort of went to autopilot and suddenly the words I was writing no longer had meaning to them. x__x Now, as a warm up, I write or type lines of sentences in which both new and old words fit, which is a pretty common exercise, I think. I start out with something really small for the first line, and then the next line I increase the length of the sentence. Then I increase the length further (adding more substance), and then I change the subject or the tense, turn it into a question, and so on.
    Like:

    Deir sé go bhfuil sí anseo.
    He says that she is here.

    Deir sé nach bhfuil sí anseo.
    He says that she is not here.

    Deir sí nach bhfuil seisean anseo anois, ach tá sise anseo.
    She says that he is not here now, but she is here.

    Deir sí nach mbeidh sé anseo amáireach, ach beidh siad anseo aríst ar aon chaoi. 
    She says he will not be here tomorrow, but they will be here again at any rate. 

     

     

    I'll make changes to the forms (normal, emphatic) and the pronouns to make sure I give them all proper attention because I hate being stuck on things like that. For instance, being on a roll writing my own paragraph and then screeching to a halt because I can't remember how to say "we have" or something. >.< It's so I get the new words to stick in my head with more meaning behind them and to help me think in Irish rather than in English. I'm getting better at writing in Irish as I'm thinking in Irish, but more often I catch myself in my head reading Irish as English because it's easier; I have to focus on deliberately thinking Irish words than English words as I'm reading! I've improved, but I still got a way to go before I read Irish by default without reminding myself to stop translating out of habit. Anyway, once I feel I'm "warmed up" with practice sentences, then I will write a paragraph that's relatable to myself until I can't think of anything more to add. Today, I wrote a simple paragraph describing my living room. Normally, I like to write with pen/pencil on paper like you, but I've begun to run low on blank notebooks with a growing collection of filled notebooks, haha! So I've started to do more of my practice on the computer in Notepad or Wordpad.

     

     

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  • Fri, Jan 18 2013 15:43 In reply to

    • celticlord88
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    Re: Vocabulary list

    I'm doing something similar but except for writing them down, I say it out loud. I write down new words I'm not familiar with and then I drill them and practice using them in sentences. Sometimes I'll add new words onto phrases and sentences I'm familiar with so those sentences or phrases don't become stale and repeative. I'll also comment on different things to myself in Irish.

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