How to say this in Gaelic ?

Latest post Fri, Sep 22 2017 11:25 by otuathail. 7 replies.
  • Tue, Mar 7 2017 21:41

    • Irishz2017
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    How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi everyone,

     

    I was just wondering what "Do you have a boyfriend" translates too as I know the grammer for "I have a boyfriend". I can't even find the answer on Google.

    Is it An bhfuil buachaill ?

    Thank you

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  • Wed, Mar 8 2017 7:38 In reply to

    • Dale D
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    I would think the correct phrase would be, "An bhfuil buachaill agat?"  The idiom "to have" is expressed using the preposition "ag" (meaning at) and the prepositional pronouns constructed from it are typically used unless a defined person is indicated.

    Dale D

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  • Wed, Sep 13 2017 1:35 In reply to

    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi 

    I am wondering how to write a name in gaelic. My husband is part Irish and I was wanting to surprise him with his name in gaelic script for a tattoo idea for his birthday. 

    His name is Zachary Shane.

    Thank you. 

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  • Thu, Sep 14 2017 14:57 In reply to

    • otuathail
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi

    Generally, a name only has an Gaelic form if it was Gaelic to begin with, or if a non-native name was borrowed and adapted and given a Gaelic form through popular use.

    The Shane part is easy enough. Shane is an anglicized form of Seán.

    But Zachary is of Hebrew origin and has no real translation or Gaelic equivalent I'm afraid. There is an Irish translation of the Old Testament and in it, Zechariah (of which Zachary is a variant) is written as Zacairiá. That's basically a madey-up phoentic spelling. Using the Old Testament example, I guess Zachary could be rendered as Zacairí. Would I get, or recommend anyone else should get a tatoo with the name Zaicairí Seán? I would not.

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  • Thu, Sep 21 2017 22:09 In reply to

    • gelliott
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi, i'm new so I don't know how this forum is run but i need desperate help in translating something to irish.

    I don't trust google translate at all.

     

    I need May you forever find joy in each other eyes, warmth in each other arms and love in each other hearts.

     

    Translated into Irish ASAP.

     

     

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  • Fri, Sep 22 2017 0:23 In reply to

    • Dale D
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    This is a forum mostly for learners, and your expression is complex enough that many of us will feel intimidated at the thought of trying it.  You may have better luck with the Irish Language Forum.

    Good luck!

    Dale D

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  • Fri, Sep 22 2017 10:45 In reply to

    • otuathail
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi Gelliott,

    I enjoy these  kind of requests. It's an opportunity to be reminded of the beauty of the Irish language (especially with a translation like this where the possibilities are endless) and in trying to find a suitable translation, I'll always pick up a few new words.

    My first stab at this would be as follows:

    Go bhfaighe sibh choíche aoibhneas i súile a chéile, cluthaireacht i mbarróg a chéile agus grá go deo i gcroíthe a chéile

    go bhfaighe sibh choíche, may you forever find

    aoibhneas, joy, delight

    i súile a chéile, in each other's eyes

    cluthaireacht, warmth, comfort (it implies covering or sheltering, so works well with the next word, barróg)

    The word barróg means a hug, so when you say i mbarróg a chéile it means in each other's arms or in each other's embrace (but, see also second translation below)

    agus grá go deo i gcroíthe a chéile, and eternal love (I embellished a little here becasue grá (love) and go deo (forever, undying, eternal, etc.) sound nice togther.

    i gcroíthe a chéile, in each other's hearts

     

    There's another phrase that comes to mind. When you hold someone close in your arms, you can say teannaim mó chroí isteach le duine. Literally, I press my heart into the person. So my second go at this would be:

    Go bhfaighe sibh choíche aoibhneas i súile a chéile, cluthaireacht ('s) croíthe teannta isteach lena chéile, agus grá go deo i gcroíthe a chéile.

    Literally

    May you forever find joy in each other's eyes, warmth (with your) hearts pressed together with each other (i.e. in each other's arms) and undying love in each other's hearts.

    And if I may take one more liberty...

    Go bhfaighe sibh choíche aoibhneas i súile a chéile, cluthaireacht ('s) croíthe teannta isteach lena chéile, agus grá go deo sa gcroíthe sin agaibh

    Literally

    May you forever find joy in each other's eyes, warmth (with your) hearts pressed together with each other (i.e. in each other's arms) and undying love in those hearts (you have)

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  • Fri, Sep 22 2017 11:25 In reply to

    • otuathail
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    Re: How to say this in Gaelic ?

    Hi Dale,

    Don't feel intimidated. Just go for it! As I said above, you'll always learn something new when you attempt any kind of a translation. Even if the end product is way off, it's a useful exercise. Although maybe add a disclaimer. My disclaimer is "Wait for Dale to catch my typos because I usually miss them!"  Big Smile

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