Téarmaí Ginealais

Latest post Mon, Jul 8 2019 16:05 by LauraHuntORI. 9 replies.
  • Sun, Jun 16 2019 1:13

    • LauraHuntORI
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    Téarmaí Ginealais

    Hurray!
    I have at last found an Irish relative. 
    Does anyone have any idea how to say "I am the ninth great-granddaughter of David O'Killia" in Irish? 
    I am guessing his name would be Daibhead Ui Ceallaigh?
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  • Tue, Jun 18 2019 17:29 In reply to

    • Dale D
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    Comhgheardeas, a Laura!

    Ceallaigh is generally translated as "Kelley" but I suspect the phonetic similarity may prove it to be an alternate, or possibly just an earlier form of the same name.

    As far as the "ninth great granddaughter"...I guess I'm not quite sure how to even say the first great grandfather...maybe something like Seanathair mór?  I'll have to dig around a little and see.  Or maybe someone else has a solution to offer.......

    Dale

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  • Tue, Jun 18 2019 17:47 In reply to

    • Dale D
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    Okay, I did a quick look-up on teanglann.ie, and they show two words for great-grandfather (neither of which was my guess)....

    1.  Garathair

    2.  Sin-seanathair

    Trying to look up"great-grand-daughter, I found the following:

    Iarua (iníne)  is great-grand-daughter

    Iarua (mic) is great-grandson (for some weird reason, grand-daughter is hyphenated but grandson is not....)

    Iarua is matched with iaró, which means "later descendant" and apparently requires the addition of a genetive designator for son or daughter.  No example sentences were given, but I presume you would use either "iníne" or "mic" with "iarua" to indicate the gender of the descendant.

    Iaró is an interesting term, as it means "later descendant" but does not seem to take the gender identifiers, or at least they are not shown.  It does have a plural form, iaróí, and a dependent plural form "iaróibh" which is also sometimes used as the nominative plural; not sure how to differentiate when which is used.....

    So I guess the question would be...do the Irish bother, as Gaeilge, to count the generations back, or do they just say "distant relative" with the appropriate term?

    Interesting, if confusing, stuff!!!

    Dale

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  • Thu, Jun 20 2019 1:10 In reply to

    • LauraHuntORI
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    Go raibh maith agat, a Dale.

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  • Fri, Jun 21 2019 16:03 In reply to

    • Dale D
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    Fáilte romhat, a Laura!

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  • Thu, Jul 4 2019 9:11 In reply to

    • Breandán
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    iníon garpháiste "great-grand-daughter"

    an naoú hiníon garpháiste "the ninth great-grand-daughter"

    Is mise an naoú hiníon garpháiste de chuid David O'Killia "I am the ninth great-grand-daughter of David O'Killia"

    Are you sure the name wasn't O'Killian with an n?

     

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  • Thu, Jul 4 2019 12:20 In reply to

    • LauraHuntORI
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    The name is rendered many ways, but none with an n: Okilly, O'Killia, O'Kelley, O'Kellia, Okille, etc. In his will, it is spelled O'Killia.

     

    Go raibh míle maith agat for the phraseology.

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  • Fri, Jul 5 2019 16:37 In reply to

    • Breandán
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    I can only find O'Kelley on Sloinne.  Ó Ceallaigh appears to be correct for that.

    Irish Identity gives David as Daibhéid.

    Is mise an naoú hiníon garpháiste de chuid Dhaibhéid Uí Cheallaigh.  "I am the ninth great-grand-daughter of David O'Killia"

    But if you are talking legal terms, you should stick with the name exactly as it is on the will:

    Is mise an naoú hiníon garpháiste de chuid David O'Killia.

     

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  • Sat, Jul 6 2019 6:11 In reply to

    • Breandán
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    Irish Identity gives Daibhéid for David.

    Sloinne
    gives Ó Ceallaigh for O'Killia.

    Is mise an naoú hiníon garpháiste de chuid Dhaibhéid Uí Cheallaigh "I am the ninth great-grand-daughter of David O'Killia"


    However, names are not normally translated, especially in legal circumstances, and the version with the English name is actually preferable from a legal standpoint. Unless the person in question used the Irish version in real life, there is no proof that the two are the same entity.

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  • Mon, Jul 8 2019 16:05 In reply to

    • LauraHuntORI
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    Re: Téarmaí Ginealais

    I'm not doing anything legal. 

    It's just a conversation starter for Irish Immersion Weekends. 

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